Obsolescence Management & The Impact on Reliability

Cheryl Tulkoff

Cheryl Tulkoff, CRE, DfR Solutions Senior Member of the Technical StaffCheryl Tulkoff has over 22 years of experience in electronics manufacturing with an emphasis on failure analysis and reliability. She has worked throughout the electronics manufacturing life cycle beginning with semiconductor fabrication processes, into printed circuit board fabrication and assembly, through functional a...read more



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The secondary market is often the supply chain of last recourse when a component product goes obsolete or is under production constraints. While it is possible to get high quality, genuine parts, it is also possible to get nonconforming, reworked, or counterfeit components. What is most frustrating is that it is increasingly difficult to differentiate genuine parts from their counterfeit equivalents. Historically, the secondary market provided a mechanism for finding parts in short supply or at reduced cost. Today, high-reliability system manufacturers are less willing to risk contamination of their supply chain with potentially substandard parts in order to save a few dollars on the cost of a part. The proliferation of counterfeit components has led to a contraction of the secondary market and an increase in the cost of parts in the marketplace. In some ways, counterfeit components that do not function are the least critical issue. While they represent a source of financial loss to the system manufacturer, their failure is at least identifiable during the system manufacturing process. Components that are substandard or reworked are actually much more difficult to manage. These parts may have been reclaimed from other systems; and in some cases, they include �scrapped� components that failed a manufacturer�s testing or quality control programs . This group of components represents a significant risk because they may function at the time of manufacture but could fail in the field. In high-reliability systems, not only is the cost of a field failure significantly higher than the cost for commercial systems, but the failure may put lives at risk- the cost of which is incalculable. This webinar will cover strategies that can be used to protect your company and products against the obsolescence risk. Topics include relevant industry standards, use of Managed Supply Programs (MSP) and Contract Pooled Options, plus long term storage recommendations and practices.

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